Wednesday, August 11, 2010

A Traditional Twist on Chuppahs

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It's possible to stick to the traditional without always following tradition (does that make sense?!) If you're having a Jewish (or even interfaith) wedding, a Chuppah is probably part of your ceremony.  

Slight break for a quick history lesson!

According to Wikipedia, A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה‎, pl. חוּפּוֹת, chuppot, literally, "canopy" or "covering"), also huppah, chupah, or chuppa, is a canopy under which a Jewish bride and groom stand during their wedding ceremony. A chuppah symbolizes the home that the couple will build together. While a Jewish marriage is still considered valid in the absence of a chuppah, a chuppah is still considered a basic requirement for a Jewish wedding.

Traditionally, a chuppah consists of a cloth or sheet, sometimes a tallit, stretched or supported over four poles, or sometimes manually held up by attendants to the ceremony. But feel free to take a modern spin on this age-old tradition.  Use flowers, silk, a hand-made quilt or even lucite to create your chuppah.  In the end, it's what the chuppah symbolizes, not what it's made of that makes this tradition special!

A lucite canopy
{image via Davinci Florist}

Lighted by hanging lanterns
{image via LI Weddings}

A silk covering
{image via Dawn Easter Events}

8 comments:

  1. I love them all, but the silk covering is my favorite!

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  2. The hanging lanterns are giving me brain tinglies. I am in love.

    By the way, when do I get a sneak peek of your gown, eh? DYING OVER HERE.

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  3. Very progressive interpretations of tradition. Awesome!

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  4. How delicate and graceful hanging lanterns, this is absolutely beautiful!

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  5. I just love the hanging lanterns. It so beautiful and lovely.

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  6. Shawls are also religiously significant for some cultures like the Jewish “tallit” that is worn during synagogue services.

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